Teachers SHINE!!

A resource for new teachers and mentors

Author: tlink (page 1 of 2)

Defining Moments-Do Students Believe Us?

“I believe in you.”

“You can do this.”

“Your hard work is being noticed.”

“I want to help you.”

Do students believe these messages? These are all phrases or messages teachers communicate to students each day. We hope (and pray) they will believe us. Hope is not a strategy, but there is a strategy that can assure they will believe your message.

We spend hours and hours lesson planning and making preparations for the students to come to us each day.  We work hard to focus on the positive and find ways to support our students both academically and emotionally. We bend over backwards and lose sleep for them. So, why wouldn’t they believe we have their best interest in mind and truly want them to be successful?

Trust-it can support or negate everything above. I believe this is best played out in how a teacher manages the classroom and deals with student challenges. If the message of expectations is consistent and upheld, then as a student, I can trust  the other things a teacher says and does are also true. What a teacher “allows” speaks volumes over what a teacher “says.” For example,  I  set the expectation in my classroom that students will practice behaviors such as walking, pushing in chairs and helping one another. If I uphold the expectation by addressing it each and every time any student is not upholding it, I am seen as trustworthy by my students-my words and actions are congruent. If I tell a student I am going to do something-I have to follow through. If I am unable to follow through-then I will need to address the reason why with the students. Credibility is huge.

These actions and behaviors translate to the moments when a student needs a teacher the most-when they are struggling. A teacher’s words and actions can truly make a difference in a student’s day and life if they are believed, trusted and genuine. It takes work and mindfulness all the days before and after to make those defining moments happen.

What are the expectations you are willing to hold tight to, everyday, not matter who the student may be? These are what you will fight for daily to fight for your student’s who need you the most in the moments we can’t predict. Choose them wisely. Execute them with tender assertiveness and care. Trust will become the hidden key to student and teacher growth.

THIS.

Difficult students & remembering why you do what you do-2 of the most “non-data” pieces that rule an educators life. I just read both of these articles from Edutopia (they are quick reads) that I think are worth your time and thinking, too. They are both spot on.

Fresh Starts for Hard to Like Students

What Students Remember Most About Teachers

This can be a tough time of year for so many reasons. You can do this! Both you and your students can come out stronger, better and blessed because of the perspective you choose to weather the storms.

When a lesson flops….and it will.

win-vs-learn

You put in the time to plan a lesson. You imagined how it would go. You knew what you were going to say and do. You could even picture the students responding and working. Then-it flopped. It happens. And, it is okay.

What you do next is where the learning and growing can occur-if you will let it. This article is a short, but great read about what to do after a lesson flops. Spoiler alert-it is not about blaming the students. Congratulations-teachers have to learn from mistakes, too. Celebrate a mistake and move on to new learning.  Isn’t that what we want our students to do?

Reflecting-the Power

The power that lies in thinking and reflecting is amazing. Finding the time and space to stop and do this can be more of an amazing feat.  As the year begins to wind down, our culture directs reflecting in front of us with the top 10 countdowns of stories, songs, tv shows and whatever else happened in world. We are encouraged to make resolutions and bid the old year goodbye-welcoming the possibilities of what is to come. That can be exciting and scary at the same time. The unknowns for type A people and planners is never a completely comfortable spot. Where do you do your best reflecting? Does it lead to change for you? Many times it does because it comes from you.

Do we build reflection opportunities for our students to go along with their learning? Providing opportunities for self-assessment and thinking about the “why” of an answer can be as powerful as the learning itself. Like everything else, it takes time and is often why it is left behind.

Secondary student and teacher reflections

Elementary student self-assessment example

Reflection for educators: What is your top 5 list of learnings for the past year? How has this impacted your growth and student learning?

 

Preparing for the year before AUGUST

Missouri’s own Mark Twain said it best, ” The secret of getting ahead is getting started.” For beginning teachers, it may seem a challenge to begin preparing for the school year when you are unsure what to expect.  You may not have been to your school yet for any length of time or had the opportunity to meet your grade level or subject area team. If you are wondering how you can start preparing now, here are some suggestions:  The first suggestion is to start now.  New teacher orientation or beginning of the year faculty meetings in early August may leave you feeling like trying to drink from a fire hydrant-a lot coming at you all at once. By starting now, you can get a head start to feeling confident on day 1 of your job and help reduce the sense of feeling overwhelmed.

1. Make sure the principal has your current email address and phone number to contact you. Find out the main form of communication your building administrator and district use to share information.

2. Visit your district and school’s website. Learn names, look at teacher webpages and review calendars to anticipate dates for programs, events, conferences and other important happenings for your district in the upcoming year.

3. Review the school handbook-become familiar with policies and procedures. This may include information about a character education program being used, grading systems, reading/math programs, extracurricular activities and plans for parent communication.

4.  Ask where to locate a copy of curriculum, common assessments, any texts or series used for instruction, standardized tests given or trainings you might need to attend. Spend time learning what you can about these and looking for examples of how others have effectively implemented them.

5. Find out when you can start setting up your classroom. It is highly recommended setting up your room be done before you begin your teacher meetings. It’s worth repeating-have it done before you officially begin if possible. It doesn’t mean you can’t make adjustments later, but the majority should be complete.

6. Create a preliminary classroom management plan. See the examples found on this website.

7. Contact the business office for the district to inquire about any paperwork you can complete before your first contract day.

8. Email your team members to introduce yourself.

9. Become familiar with the technology plan and technology available for you to use.

10.  If you are not living in the same town for which you are working, take a drive around town. Find out where students for whom you will be teaching like to visit or ways to get to know more about the community. The Chamber of Commerce is always an excellent resource.

Your time invested now when you can choose your best working time will be worth the effort.  Your administrators and coworkers will recognize a motivated and eager professional ready to be at his/her best for the students. This is a great way to start the year and your career!

 

Mentors-contact your mentee as early as possible. Your time invested with them and the items above will help you both get off to a great start!

Teachers TOOT way too much!

No, I’m not talking about gas.

I spend a lot of time in  classrooms at all grade levels. As I watch both the students and the teachers, it is an all too common fact that TEACHERS WORK WAY too hard! I know this is not a shock to anyone in the classroom right now. Let me explain further…

 Teachers do way too much thinking for students.  After lesson planning,  grading, doing paperwork, attending meetings and contacting parents, we are also talking and thinking for students. Stop TOOTING teachers!

TOOT-which stands for Teacher Only One Talking  is  common in the classroom. Non-verbal expert, Michael Grinder, in his book  Envoy, coined this acronym to encourage teachers to use nonverbal cues to manage the classroom (it works). I would extend this sage advice and caution to the direct instruction component of a lesson.  Here is an summary of a lesson taught in two different ways:

The teacher plans to use an article and follow-up questions to work with students on using evidence from a  text to support answers.  He tells students to start byfirst looking at the questions . He then explains how to use a highlighter to underline evidence to support their answer to the questions.  In addition,  he reads the article out loud for students to follow along. After this, he may demonstrate and explain each step of the  answering process and  ask the students  a few questions along the way. Many or few hands are raised to respond to questions and one or two may be called upon to provide the “right” answer.  Hence…the teacher is TOOT-ing throughout the lesson.

or…

The teacher tells the students the target of the lesson is to practice using evidence from text to support answers to questions. He asks students to first think for 15 seconds and then share with a shoulder partner what might be the first step. A few students are called upon (all should be able to answer) and the opportunity to add anything not shared already is provided. The teacher adds to student responses by sharing  thinking about why choosing to read the questions first would be a good strategy. As each of the steps are discussed based on student input, the teacher can hear the thinking behind students’ approach to the work. He can then guide them as needed. As long as the text is at an appropriate readability level, students can read silently or in partners after the teacher models reading (and  thinking) for the beginning of the passage. Together, the class can create a model of the steps to answering the questions and using evidence to support answers. Through student talking, the teacher can get a good gauge of where students are needing the most support and how much guided practice is needed before allowing students to practice independently. Teachers and student talk is distributed and student responses can guide the next steps.

The book title, Never Work Harder Than Your Students by Robyn Jackson, captures what teachers should strive for. So much time is spent lesson planning, not to mention the many other decisions to make for learning. It is understandable that when it comes time to teach a lesson, the teacher takes the wheel and drives full speed ahead. It may also be thought that it is easier to manage the classroom when the teacher is talking and the students have to be quiet and listen.

What if teacher’s could still stay in control of the lesson, but shift more of the work to the students? What if instead of the teacher telling students exactly what to do, he or she tapped into having students do the thinking? Being a “guide, so no student can hide” instead of “sage on the stage” might lead to more energy for an after-school celebration! Students will enjoy the learning, not to mention learn more. Try talking less, and listening more. You might be surprised that you become a learner, too.

Mentors: Discuss with your mentee, “When do you notice your students least engaged?” Talk about increasing student “talk time” that is well structured and productive.  How do you teach student talk time expectations, just like any procedure or routine? How can you plan questions during lesson planning that promote student thinking?

 

The Voice

The reality show “The Voice” offers vocal contestants the opportunity to sing for four popular musical entertainment artists in a blind audition. The coaches’ chairs are faced towards the audience during rookie artists’ performances; those interested in an artist press their button. .

What if in education we had “the lesson?” What if there was only a auditory recording of the teacher in classroom? What would you hope to hear? Based on the words used, expression, tone, and volume-what qualities would you use to pick your teacher artist?

Use the link below to share what you would want to hear.
Share here

Entertainment, in many forms , thrives on the sensationalizing of struggle and then success. The culture of error is not always as entertaining when we are a part of it. However, feedback and learning are strongest in the presence of error. Making it safe to be wrong is one of the most powerful gifts a teacher can provide students in his or her classroom. Here is a link to an example of a classroom for which time to think, process and support errors are valued.

Culture of Error

Teachers must plan the classroom to be alert to learning failures (“error”) as soon as it begins occurring. This is why designing formative assessments toward your target and goal are critical. Like a driver using a rear-view mirror–good drivers check them every five seconds. Click here to connect to 56 examples of formative assessments. Having a plan after providing the formative assessment is important for being responsive to student errors.
Students have a part of in the culture of error process, too. They can work to hide their errors from their teacher (most are skilled at this), in which case they are much harder to see, or they can willingly expose their errors without fear of embarrassment. Knowing the learning targets and learning goal, knowing what it looks like to hit the target and having this insight to share exactly which part difficult is a a great start to creating the positive culture of error.

Mentors-Talk with your mentee about dignifying errors and helping students with think time. I like to use the acronym of 3 R’s when a student answers a question wrong-Restate the question, Reduce the question (go back a step) or help the student to Relearn. Using wait time is a skill that has to be practiced. How can students be held accountable for responding to the learning if they don’t know or are confused?

 

What Do Your Assignments Say About You?

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8 Minutes that Matter

The primacy and recency effect states that you remember best the first and last thing you hear. It makes sense then that opening and closing of your lessons need to be powerful to stick. How much time during lesson planning do you consider these components?

Think about a time when you were so captured by something that you didn’t realize how much time had passed. Maybe it was a book you were reading, a movie you were watching or a stimulating conversation. Maybe it was even a video game. Why did this happen? How can we create moments like this for our students? Two recent article on Edutopia provide great insight and ideas on the most 8 minute of teaching that matter most and why stimulating curiosity enhances learning.

It is so easy to get wrapped up in the daily tasks of paperwork, meeting deadlines and assessments to lose focus on what matters most. We didn’t go into teaching for those things. We became educators to help students learn what is necessary for tomorrow,  a year from now and ten years from now. When you pursue your own learning “for fun,” it is not because a worksheet is awaiting you or for a score on a test. We as humans learn naturally because we have a purpose or are curious. We have a need to fill in the blanks (clozentrophy is the actual name for this-see Marzano.)

As you think about how you spend your time lesson planning, do you stop to consider the first four and last four minutes as critical? It can make a huge difference in student engagement and learning.

Mentors: Guiding questions to share with your mentee:

Tell me your approach to lesson planning and what you think about as you plan.

How will you “hook” students for learning in each lesson?

How will you know where students are with their learning after a lesson?

When you think about lessons that captured your attention as a student, what do you remember?

Think about a lesson that went well this year. What might be some factors? How did you know it went well?

Just a thought…

At the end of the day when you are exhausted, frustrated or doubting yourself as a teacher, just remember-what really counts can’t be measured. Excited to teach teacher have excited to learn learners.

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